Mountain People’s Health Center

MOUNTAIN PEOPLE’S THEN AND NOW

A comprehensive history (1974-2023) of a vibrant community-owned and community-operated clinic network in East Tennessee composed by Caryl Carpenter 2024   I came to East Tennessee in December of 1975. The Board of Directors of Mountain People’s Health Councils (MPHC) had hired me to be their administrator. MPHC was founded in 1974. The first administrator, …

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On John Kennedy’s management of UMW’s Black Lung Treatment Programs, Kentucky and Tennessee

John Kennedy describes the evolution of his career and transition to Washington in 1974. Upon suggestion from Eula Hall, Director of the Mud Creek Clinic, and with an official offer from Tom Ludwig, the union rep responsible for occupational health and safety initiatives, Kennedy began to manage the Kentucky and Tennessee programs under UMW’s Black …

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Progression of black lung care toward government-funded clinics, 1973

John Kennedy describes monumental developments in black lung care during the summer of 1973, primarily as it pertains to the establishment of state and federally funded clinics. He details the complex effort in acquiring these funds, including the role key players had in placing pressure on the Tennessee State Health Department to monitor black lung …

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Sally Kimberly and Rick Davidson on the generosity of local surgeons

Sally Kimberly and Rick Davidson discuss the life-saving assistance from local Scott County surgeons who offered to take free-of-cost patients in need of additional care. Sally describes the deal between her and Chuck Darling and Rick comments on Dave Stanley’s commitment to surgical patients in Oak Ridge.   Full footage of Sally Kimberly’s interview with Rick Davidson.

Sally Kimberly on MPHC community boards

Sally Kimberly discusses the challenges of collaborating with community boards on the frontier of a practice largely unfamiliar in Appalachia at the time—community-driven, rural healthcare. Unique to her and other nurse practitioners’ experience was a widespread misunderstanding about their role. Reminiscing about these hurdles, Sally shares what it was like to be a pioneer in the field. She concludes with a commentary on the importance of education in the work …

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