Pre-Existing Conditions

More on local opposition to the Petros Clinic

Kate Bradley expands on the issues she explains are often characteristic of small, rural communities and how such things as ignorance and jealousy impeded their efforts to build a community clinic in Petros, Tenn. She describes a few specific examples of local opposition and details their collaborative lobbying in response, featuring Irwin Venick, Bill Corr, …

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“We had to work with one hand and fight with the other”

Kate Bradley narrates the process by which Mountain Peoples Health Council (MPHC) acquired land to build the Petros Clinic. She describes the stiff political atmosphere in Nashville, where she went to plead her case before a judge, and explains why local response to MPHC being granted the land was less than enthused: ignorance and jealousy. …

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On the Bradley’s motivation to organize a community clinic in Petros, Tenn.

Kate Bradley frames the initiative to organize a local health council and community clinic as a direct response to the Petros health fair’s preliminary identification of needs. She details early fundraising efforts, including Pat Kalmans’ key role in securing grant money, and outlines the clinic’s legal incorporation, naming John Kennedy and John Williams not only …

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Key players in the health fair and early days of the clinic in Petros, Tenn.

Caryl Carpenter, Rick Davidson, and Irwin Venick meet with Kate and J.W. Bradley to discuss the Petros health fair and community clinic. They list several of the early players involved with both, including Wanda and Gary Lang, Bob Hartmann, John Gaventa, Perry Steele, Cathy Stanley, Pat Kalmans, Bill Dow, and Bill Greenberg, a reporter for …

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On core tenets of sustainability and the role of business planning in community organizing

Nancy Raybin delves into the core tenets of sustainability (such as governance, self-preservation, and long-term impact metrics) to further stress the value of bringing business planning to community organizing. Follow this link for access to the full-length interview. Recorded October 28th, 2021.

On the St. Charles Clinic’s economic model: “…it had to survive beyond the goodwill of volunteers”

Nancy Raybin describes the growth and development of the St. Charles Clinic over time. She provides insight about what distinguished this one from others in East Tennessee, with emphasis on the value of applying business principles and establishing an economic model that together would facilitate long-term sustainability. She also comments on the effect different political …

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Did we make a difference? Margaret Ecker and Rosie Hammond reflect.

Margaret Ecker and Rosie Hammond grapple with the question: did we (the SHC) make a difference? Margaret shares how, in reflection of Art Van Zee’s insight to ongoing addiction throughout southwest Virginia and the Appalachian region, there are new challenges to address, different than those tackled by the SHC in the 60s and 70s. From …

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On miner’s limited access to health and/or legal support for Black Lung Disease management

John Kennedy describes the initial inundation of legal clinics with Black Lung cases, due largely to nonexistent dust control in underground mines and extremely limited access to physicians and lawyers who could help with disease management. He provides further insight into the issue by discussing the indifference of United Mine Workers (UMW) under the leadership …

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The challenges of traditional rural midwifery

Barbara Clinton explains what she learned of the challenges associated with midwifery in rural areas, traditionally known as granny midwives, and the Center’s resulting impetus to support local women with training and funding through the Maternal-Infant Health Outreach Worker Project (MIHOW). See the full length video of this road trip conversation to learn more about MIHOW.

Left to right: Marian Colette, Minnie Bommer, Tilda Kemplen, Linda Stein, Mary Elliott; Barbara Clinton, Project Director and daughter Greta in front

The role and impact of MIHOW outreach workers

Barbara Clinton frames the Maternal-Infant Health Outreach Worker Project (MIHOW) as a sustainability-driven next step to the care and relationships initiated by Coalition health fairs. She delineates the role outreach workers filled and the immense impact local women had on promoting pregnancy support and prenatal care in rural areas. See the full length video of this …

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